Past Events

Events 2017-2018

Events 2016-2017

Events 2015-2016

Events 2014-2015

Events 2013-2014
 

  • Film Group on November 27 at 2pm

Series Seven - Eastern Europe: Before the Fall
After WWII, the Soviet bloc countries of Eastern Europe developed significant cinematic outputs in spite of severe constraints on artistic freedom.  There was always a strong cinema tradition there, as film was considered a key element in furthering the Communist revolution.  Although criticism of the government had to remain muted, political comment managed a strong presence and outside influences, such as the realist impulse from France and the art film movement from Western Europe in general, had a strong impact on Eastern Europe filmmaking, which stands shoulder to shoulder with the accomplishments of the West.  This fecundity in film continues today as Eastern European films occupy prominent places in the top film festivals around the world.

Europa Europa (1991) by Agnieszka Holland dramatizes the real life story of Solomon Perel, who survived the Holocaust by hiding his Jewishness beneath an Aryan mask, even joining the Hitler Youth. Highly controversial, the film was called anti-Semitic by Claude Lanzmann and denied submission as a foreign film Oscar nominee. Made in Germany (the Polish-born writer-director was forced into exile as a result of the 1981 Poland military coup), the film was one of the highest grossing German films of all time as well as a hit in the US. Holland went on to develop a successful international career, making films in a number of western countries.

 

When: Tuesday, November 27 at 2pm
Where: West Mall Swing Space building, 2175 West Mall, Room 109

 
  • General Meeting on November 21 at 1pm
Phil Gregory will be speaking in November on food production and agricultural practices.
More information will follow closer to the event.
 
When: Wednesday, November 21 from 1-3:30pm
 

1:00pm: Coffee, tea and conversation
1:45pm: Business meeting
2:00pm: Presentation by Phil Gregory, Physics and Astronomy

Where:  Jack Poole Hall, Alumni Centre

 

  • Philosophers’ Café on November 16 at 10:30am
“Happy Holidays”?
Christmas, Winter Solstice, December holiday, whatever one calls it – the season brings up a multitude of emotions. For many people it is a welcome break, a chance to eat special food, to get together with family,  a time to go to church. For children there is all the excitement of stockings and presents. There’s an expectation of feeling merry and generous.
Christmas cheer is a great concept. Yet sometimes it is far from the reality of this time of year: People compare their emotions to what they assume others are experiencing or what they’re supposed to feel. We compare our lives to an unrealistic representation of shiny, perfect Christmas experiences with which we are bombarded by the media.
We’re over Halloween now. How do you feel about the next holiday season?
 
When: Friday, November 16 from 10:30-11:30am
Where: Tapestry at Wesbrook Village, 3338 Wesbrook Mall
 
The Philosopher’s Cafés will be held in the Club Room in Tapestry at Wesbrook Village from 10:30 to 11:30am. Coffee and tea will be offered by Tapestry. You may reserve to have lunch at Tapestry after the Café by calling (604) 225-5000 or by checking in with the front desk before the Café.) 
 
 
  • Travel Group on November 15 at 3pm

Paul Steinbok will present on a Mekong River cruise in Vietnam and Cambodia.
All Emeriti and partners are welcome. If you have a topic or travel experience you would like to discuss or present, please contact Richard Spencer, richard@rhspencer.ca. Also, please contact Richard to be added to the email list. 

When: Thursday, November 15 at 3pm
Where:  Polygon Homes Classroom 224, Alumni Centre
 

  • Senior Scholars’ Series with Jo-Ann Archibald Q’um Q’um Xiiem, Educational Studies
    November 8
"Making Sense of Being an Indigenous Scholar"
 
The speaker will share her reflections about her career in Indigenous Education, focusing on what it meant for her to be one of the very few Indigenous scholars in the academy. She will tell stories about her mentors, milestone moments, and key challenges related to her faculty and leadership positions at UBC. Core themes will include making systemic changes in the academy, creating space for Indigenous knowledge systems, working with Indigenous communities and organizations, and facilitating opportunities for reconciliation. Lessons learned from Raven, Eagle, Coyote, and Thunderbird will be included in these reflective stories.
 

When: Thursday, November 8, 2018 from 5:00-6:30pm
Where: Green College Coachhouse, 6201 Cecil Green Park Road.

Complimentary tea and coffee are available in the Piano Lounge of Graham House at Green College from 4:30 pm onwards. Those attending talks at Green College are warmly invited to come to dinner. For information on making dinner reservations, please see http://www.greencollege.ubc.ca/how-attend-dinner
 
 
  • Film Group on October 23 at 2pm

Series Seven - Eastern Europe: Before the Fall
After WWII, the Soviet bloc countries of Eastern Europe developed significant cinematic outputs in spite of severe constraints on artistic freedom.  There was always a strong cinema tradition there, as film was considered a key element in furthering the Communist revolution.  Although criticism of the government had to remain muted, political comment managed a strong presence and outside influences, such as the realist impulse from France and the art film movement from Western Europe in general, had a strong impact on Eastern Europe filmmaking, which stands shoulder to shoulder with the accomplishments of the West.  This fecundity in film continues today as Eastern European films occupy prominent places in the top film festivals around the world.

The Mirror (1974) by Andrei Tarkovsky is a stream of consciousness rendering of the inner life of an off-screen protagonist, who might be considered to be either the director himself, a typical 20th century Soviet individual, or mankind in general. The film eschews narrative logic in favor of film’s ability to depict emotional states (in this case that of anxiety rooted in a fear of potentially immediate death) with each of the film’s fragments producing a feeling more than a meaning. The first three parts of the film explore this condition of anxiety while the fourth, final part shows how we can live in the face of such a fate. 

When: Tuesday, October 23 at 2pm
Where: West Mall Swing Space building, 2175 West Mall, Room 109

 
  • Philosophers’ Café on October 19 at 10:30am
"Referendum on Electoral Reform"
Voting begins on October 22nd in a BC referendum on electoral reform. Voters will first be asked whether they want to change the existing system. The second question on the ballot will offer a choice of three types of PR. If more than 50 percent of the public votes yes to change on the first question, a simple majority will decide which of the three systems will be instituted. Proportional representation is touted as doing a better job of allocating seats based on the number of votes cast for the respective parties;  “first past the post” adherents argue that it is a system that has produced stable governments for decades.   What do you think?  Do you know enough about the three PR systems being offered? Are you a passionate advocate for one answer or another, or are you still sitting on the fence?  
 
When: Friday, October 19 from 10:30-11:30am
Where: Tapestry at Wesbrook Village, 3338 Wesbrook Mall
 
The Philosopher’s Cafés will be held in the Club Room in Tapestry at Wesbrook Village from 10:30 to 11:30am. Coffee and tea will be offered by Tapestry. You may reserve to have lunch at Tapestry after the Café by calling (604) 225-5000 or by checking in with the front desk before the Café.) 

 

  • Travel Group on October 18 at 3pm

On Thursday, October 18, Nancy Langton will describe her travels in Morocco.
All Emeriti and partners are welcome. If you have a topic or travel experience you would like to discuss or present, please contact Richard Spencer, richard@rhspencer.ca. Also, please contact Richard to be added to the email list. 

When: Thursday, October 18 at 3pm
Where: Buchanon, room D312, 1866 Main Mall
 

  • General Meeting on October 17 at 1pm 
“The Electoral System Referendum”

British Columbians are to vote in a November referendum to decide how their electoral politics and government should be conducted and organized.

The referendum will ask two questions:
1) Should BC maintain its current voting system or change to one based on the concept of proportional representation.
2) If we are to move to PR how would you rank the three proposed options.

If the response to the first question is for change, the second will be used to decide what kind of system is to be adopted.

Electoral systems are both complex and consequential. To explore the issues raised by the referendum we have two speakers.
Ken Carty (Emeritus political science) will discuss the basic features of the current system and explore and explain the options that the government has presented.
Richard Johnston (Canada Research Chair in Elections and Representation) will consider the impact of changing the system for electoral and legislative politics.

All emeriti and partners are welcome. 
When: Wednesday, October 17 at 1pm 
1pm: Coffee, tea and cookies 
1:45pm: Business meeting
2:00pm: Presentation by Ken Carty and Richard Johnston
Where: Sage Restaurant, University Centre (Old Faculty Club), 6331 Crescent Road

 

  • Senior Scholars’ Series with Ashok Kotwal, Economics,
    October 11
"A Journey in Economic Development: Theory, Policy and Activism"
 
Ashok Kotwal grew up in India, and worked first as an electrical engineer in that country and then in the computer industry in Massachusetts. The gap in standards of living made it natural to ask why countries like India stayed so poor while others prospered. Economics provided an answer: stylized facts could be explained by a hypothesis based on basic assumptions about behaviour. That was the appeal of ‘theory.’ Over the years, however, the field of Economics would become more empirical, techniques of analysis more sophisticated, and Ashok’s own interests more policy-oriented. He also discovered that there was much to learn about grass-roots realities from social activists. For the last six years, he has been editing an online newsletter called Ideas for India. Its mission is to enhance the quality of public debate in India by making the findings of academic research accessible to the lay public.
 

When: Thursday, October 11, 2018 from 5:00-6:30pm
Where: Green College Coachhouse, 6201 Cecil Green Park Road.

Complimentary tea and coffee are available in the Piano Lounge of Graham House at Green College from 4:30 pm onwards. Those attending talks at Green College are warmly invited to come to dinner. For information on making dinner reservations, please see http://www.greencollege.ubc.ca/how-attend-dinner
 
 
  • Film Group on September 25 at 2pm

Series Seven - Eastern Europe: Before the Fall
After WWII, the Soviet bloc countries of Eastern Europe developed significant cinematic outputs in spite of severe constraints on artistic freedom.  There was always a strong cinema tradition there, as film was considered a key element in furthering the Communist revolution.  Although criticism of the government had to remain muted, political comment managed a strong presence and outside influences, such as the realist impulse from France and the art film movement from Western Europe in general, had a strong impact on Eastern Europe filmmaking, which stands shoulder to shoulder with the accomplishments of the West.  This fecundity in film continues today as Eastern European films occupy prominent places in the top film festivals around the world.

Loves of a Blonde (1965) by Milos Forman is a key text of the Czech New Wave, which became a major new development in post-World War II world cinema.  Reacting against state-sanctioned social realist propaganda and borrowing from the 60s youth-inspired free-form realism of the French New Wave, the film also features a whimsy particular to Eastern European films.  Admired by political filmmakers such as Ken Loach, the film focuses on the bittersweet (more than comic) misadventures of a young Czech factory worker, revealing how the Communist system betrayed promises made to women by the revolution.

When: Tuesday, September 25 at 2pm
Where: West Mall Swing Space building, 2175 West Mall, Room 109
 

  • Photo Group on September 21 at 4pm

When: Friday, September 21 at 4pm
Where: room 158 at the Ike Barber Learning Centre
 

  • Travel Group on September 20 at 3pm

On Thursday, September 20, David McClung, an emeritus professor in Geography, who has been trekking and mountaineering in Kirghizstan, NW and SW China, Pakistan, India, Nepal and Bhutan, will show photos of the world's highest peaks, comment on the snow and ice features, and give some expectations about the effects of climate change.

When: Thursday, September 20 at 3pm
Where: Polygon Room, Alumni Centre
 

  • Senior Scholars’ Series with Indira Samarasekera, Metals and Materials Engineering, September 20
"Of Serendipity, Steel and (not only Mechanical) Engineering"
 
Indira Samarasekera’s journey from the Island of Serendip, now known as Sri Lanka, to an exciting career of discovery and application in steel processing, was marked by moments of genuine serendipity. One of a dozen female engineers from the University of Ceylon in 1974, she spent two years doing materials research at the University of California. Following a Masters degree, she came to UBC and stumbled into an opportunity to do mathematical modelling of steel processing at a time when large-scale computing was just becoming a reality. Her research had a significant impact on the steel industry worldwide and was accompanied by fascinating experiences of working in a nearly all-male environment. Then, what she thought would be a brief detour into university administration, as Vice-President Research at UBC, turned into a second career…
 

When: Thursday, September 20, 2018 from 5:00-6:30pm
Where: Green College Coachhouse, 6201 Cecil Green Park Road.

Complimentary tea and coffee are available in the Piano Lounge of Graham House at Green College from 4:30 pm onwards. Those attending talks at Green College are warmly invited to come to dinner. For information on making dinner reservations, please see http://www.greencollege.ubc.ca/how-attend-dinner

 

  • Philosophers’ Café on September 21 at 10:30am
"Kindness"
Kindness is defined as the quality of being friendly, generous, and considerate.  (Synonyms are warmheartedness, affection, warmth, gentleness, concern, care.)   
We can be kind to others; others can be kind to us; and we can be kind to ourselves. Kindness comes in many forms that don’t always look “kind.”   
What counts as “right” and “good” to one person might not to the next: we’ve all heard the expression “you may have to be cruel to be kind”.  
Is being kind to oneself just selfishness?  What do you think kindness is?
When you think about when kindness has shown up in your life, what difference did it make?   Why does kindness matter?
 
When: Friday, September 21 from 10:30-11:30am
Where: Tapestry at Wesbrook Village, 3338 Wesbrook Mall
 
The Philosopher’s Cafés will be held in the Club Room in Tapestry at Wesbrook Village from 10:30 to 11:30am. Coffee and tea will be offered by Tapestry. You may reserve to have lunch at Tapestry after the Café by calling (604) 225-5000 or by checking in with the front desk before the Café.) 

 

2017-2018

  • Film Group on June 26 at 2pm

The movie “The Quilombo” by Carlos Diegues provides a more “insider” view of an exotic space (here, the 17th century Brazilian jungle) through a fantastical story (nevertheless based on fact) of runaway slave communities (called quilombos), specifically the most famous of these: Palmares, ruled for decades by the legendary chief Ganga Zuma. Instead of a neo-realist, aesthetics of hunger approach, the film offers a postmodern, pleasurable spectacle that favors a syncretic cultural rather than a political revolution and delighting in low cultural forms, such as carnival and popular music as it presents a comic approach to relations between colonizers and colonized, indulging in the Brazilian1980s optimistic shift from dictatorship to the hope for a new, utopian Brazil.

 

 

  • Film Group on April 24 at 2pm

Movie Dersu Uzala (1975)
Directed by Akira Kurosawa (1920-1998)

To get on the mailing list for meeting announcements, please contact John Leblanc: john.leblanc@ubc.ca

When: Tuesday, April 24 at 2pm
Where: 
Orchard Commons, room 4016, 6363 Agronomy Road

 

 

 

  • Philosophers’ Café on April 20 at 10:30am
"Bridging the Generation Gap"
We hear more and more in the news about the generation gap between “baby boomers” (seniors)and “millennials” (the young). Baby boomers are sitting on huge amounts of assets in real estate, while millennials can’t afford to live in Vancouver/London/Sydney. Baby boomers won’t retire and allow millennials to step into their jobs. Baby boomers voted “Leave” in Brexit, for Trump in the US; millennials voted for “Remain” and Bernie Saunders. Baby boomers and millennials clash in the workplace because they have very different attitudes to employment. What’s in a name? How do generations get characterized and named? What can be done to bridge the gap?
 
When: Friday, April 20 from 10:30-11:30am
Where: Tapestry at Wesbrook Village, 3338 Wesbrook Mall
 
The Philosopher’s Cafés will be held in the Club Room in Tapestry at Wesbrook Village from 10:30 to 11:30am. Coffee and tea will be offered by Tapestry. You may reserve to have lunch at Tapestry after the Café by calling (604) 225-5000 or by checking in with the front desk before the Café.) 
 
 
  • Travel Group on April 19 at 3pm

Presentation by Beverley Green on Guatemala.
If there is a topic you could present on, or would like the group to discuss, at a future meeting, please contact Richard Spencer, richard@rhspencer.ca. Also, please contact Richard to be added to the email list for this group.

When: Thursday, April 19 at 3pm
Where: room 222, Alumni Centre

 

  • Annual General Meeting on April 18 at 1pm 
Presentation by Judith Hall, Professor Emerita of Medical Genetics
All emeriti and partners are welcome. 
When: Wednesday, April 18 at 1pm 
1pm: Coffee, tea and cookies and book display
1:30pm: Presentation of President's Award of Distinguished Service by UBC Emeriti and remarks by President Ono
2:15pm: Business meeting
2:45pm: Presentation by Judith Hall, Professor Emerita of Medical Genetics
4:15pm: Wine and Cheese Reception
Where: Jack Poole Hall, Alumni Centre 
 
 
  • Celebrating Emeritus Research: Luncheon and Talks on April 12
     

More information available on our webpage.

When: Thursday, April 12 at noon
Where: Peter Wall Institute6331 Crescent Road

 

  • Senior Scholars’ Series with Evan Kreider, Music, April 3
"Largo, ma non troppo? Tempi of a career in music"
 
Barely had Evan Kreider begun to settle into what he mistook for academic tranquility at UBC when he was overtaken by rumours that his beloved field of Renaissance musicology was undergoing a revolution. Used to scores being engraved onto copper sheets by aging craftsmen in rural Italy, he was soon startled to learn he was required to produce them himself by computer software that was not quite up to the challenge.
 
And then, just as he was beginning to dream again of a stable academic life (now as a full professor), he was yanked into the dark side of the academy—administration—and a role for which no seminar could ever have prepared him. Meanwhile, the music of another administrator, Hildegard von Bingen, who ran a Benedictine monastery in the twelfth century, was becoming all the rage through recordings. But would she, if she could hear them, have even recognized the sounds?
 
This talk for the Senior Scholars’ Series is crosslisted for the Green College series on Transforming Sounds / Altered Selves: How Music Changes in Time, Changes Us, and Changes Our Worlds.
 
When: Tuesday, April 3, 2018 from 5:00-6:30pm
Where: Green College Coachhouse, 6201 Cecil Green Park Road.
 
Complimentary tea and coffee are available in the Piano Lounge of Graham House at Green College from 4:30 pm onwards. Those attending talks at Green College are warmly invited to come to dinner. For information on making dinner reservations, please see http://www.greencollege.ubc.ca/how-attend-dinner
 
 
  • Film Group on March 27 at 2pm

The last film in this term's series is Bhaji on the Beach (1994) by Gurinder Chada. He uses comedy to challenge the limiting of diasporic Indian women to narrow identities within a fantasized Indian past and to the private realm of family. It features a range of Britain-based Indian women from the ages of 16 to 60 on an outing to the working class resort of Blackpool. Exposing the racism and sexism that marginalizes the women, the film examines issues such as arranged marriages, miscegenation, and restrictions on female sexuality, emphasizing the need for a hybrid identity where home is no longer the country of origin but an imagined community appropriating elements from both old and new cultures.

To get on the mailing list for meeting announcements, please contact John Leblanc: john.leblanc@ubc.ca

When: Tuesday, March 27 at 2pm
Where: room 3016, Orchard Commons, 
6363 Agronomy Road

 
  • General Meeting on March 21 at 2pm
More information about the speakers and subject is available at: https://www.emeriti.ubc.ca/general-meetings
All emeriti and partners are welcome.
When: Wednesday, March 21 at 2pm
2pm: Coffee, tea and cookies
2:45pm: Business meeting
3pm: Piano recital by Robert Silverman
Where: St. John's College, 2111 Lower Mall
 
 
  • Philosophers’ Café on March 16 at 10:30am
The Ethics of Artificial Intelligence 
Colloquially, the term "artificial intelligence" is applied when a machine mimics "cognitive" functions that humans associate with other human minds, including successfully understanding human speech, being able to play complicated games such as chess, driving cars, and interpreting complex data. The idea of creating artificial beings endowed with human-like intelligence has been the subject of myth, fiction and philosophy for centuries. Some enthuse that AI will release humans from drudgery; others believe that AI, unlike previous technological revolutions, will create a risk of mass unemployment. What do you think? 
 
When: Friday, March 16 from 10:30-11:30am
Where: Tapestry at Wesbrook Village, 3338 Wesbrook Mall
 
The Philosopher’s Cafés will be held in the Club Room in Tapestry at Wesbrook Village from 10:30 to 11:30am. Coffee and tea will be offered by Tapestry. You may reserve to have lunch at Tapestry after the Café by calling (604) 225-5000 or by checking in with the front desk before the Café.) 

 

  • Travel Group on March 15 at 3pm

At this meeting, we plan to have a round table discussion. Please think about trips you have made, or are planning to make, and be ready to share your ideas for books, fiction and non-, to read before your go (or while you’re there), things you should know before you leave (or that you wish you had known before you left). We are looking forward to an interesting meeting, with lots of good discussion!

If there is a topic you could present on, or would like the group to discuss, at a future meeting, please contact Richard Spencer, richard@rhspencer.ca. Also, please contact Richard to be added to the email list for this group.

When: Thursday, March 15 at 3pm
Where: room 461, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, 1961 East Mall

 

  • My Health, My Responsibility - A New UBCAPE Lecture Series, March 13 at 2pm

Richard Mathias, Professor Emeritus of Population and Public Health, will start off a new lecture series with his talk: From the Tobacco Wars to the Sugar Wars—Here We Go Again: Planning a Diet for Optimizing Health and Minimizing Chronic Health Risks.

Our plan is to offer a health-related talk once or twice each year. Our next health lecture, in the fall of 2018, will be on hearing and aging. Please let the Programs Committee know if there is a healthrelated topic you would particularly like to hear about. Contact Carolyn Gilbert (carolyn.gilbert@ubc.ca) or Bill McCutcheon (mccutche@phas.ubc.ca).

When: Tuesday, March 13 at 2pm
Where: Michael Smith Auditorium, 2185 East Mall

 

  • Film Group on February 27 at 2pm

Xala (1974) by Ousmane Sembene, taking place in Senegal during the removal of French control, harshly satirizes independence as corrupted by fetishistic neo-colonial materialisms and patriarchy. Remotivating the traditional African griot folktale from praise to social critique, the film calls for a productive mixing of African and Euro-American, rural and urban, and “primitive” and “civilized” elements, employing a Third Cinema “aesthetics of hunger” allied with a Brechtian offering of characters as types that we must analyze intellectually instead of identify with, yet culminating in what is perhaps the most astonishing ending in cinema history.

To get on the mailing list for meeting announcements, please contact John Leblanc: john.leblanc@ubc.ca

When: Tuesday, February 27 at 2pm
Where: room 222 at the Alumni Centre, 6163 University Blvd.

 

  • Travel Group on February 15 at 3pm

Philip Beck, from Personal Travel Management, will be talking on “Making your travel bucket list happen.” Philip will be discussing how a good travel agent can help you have an enjoyable travel experience, and reviewing some trips you might want to consider.

You can buy refreshments at the Loafe Café and bring them to the meeting. As always, partners and guests are welcome.

To get on the mailing list for meeting announcements, please contact Richard Spencer: richard@rhspencer.ca

When: Thursday, February 15 at 3pm
Where: room 224 at the Alumni Centre, 6163 University Blvd.

 

  • Photography Group on February 9 at 3:30pm

The Photography Group is looking forward to another interesting year sharing photographs, picture-taking techniques, and post-production tips.
The group welcomes new members. To get on the mailing list for meeting announcements, please contact Derek Applegarth: derekjenny@shaw.ca.

When: Friday, February 9 at 3:30pm
Where: Angus Building, room 292, 2053 Main Mall

 

  • General Meeting on February 7 at 1pm
More information about the speakers and subject is available at: https://www.emeriti.ubc.ca/general-meetings
All emeriti and partners are welcome.
When: Wednesday, February 7 at 1pm
1pm: Coffee, tea and cookies
1:45pm: Business meeting
2pm: Presentation speakers
Where: Jack Poole Hall at the Alumni Centre, 6163 University Blvd.

 

  •  Senior Scholars’ Series with Beverley Green, Botany, Tuesday, February 6
"Harvesting Light and Chasing Genes: A Winding Path Through The Landscape Of Modern Biology"
 
The first molecular biologist to be appointed in the UBC Botany Department, Beverley Green seized the chance to pursue her interest in photosynthesis, the process by which light energy is converted into chemical energy and sustains all living organisms. Discovering the major role played in that process by families of related proteins led her to her second major theme: understanding how genes and metabolic pathways evolve and acquire novel functions. In this talk she will retrace some of her scientific journey, touching on the role of chance and the importance of not sticking to a single narrow path if one wants to have an interesting and productive career.
 
When: Tuesday, February 6, 2018 from 5:00-6:30pm
Where: Green College Coachhouse, 6201 Cecil Green Park Road.
 
Complimentary tea and coffee are available in the Piano Lounge of Graham House at Green College from 4:30 pm onwards. Those attending talks at Green College are warmly invited to come to dinner. For information on making dinner reservations, please see http://www.greencollege.ubc.ca/how-attend-dinner
 
 
  • Finance Group on January 31 at 3pm
John Fleming will be discussing "How to Create the Biggest Impact with Your Charitable Giving".  John is Associate Director, Gift & Estate Planning, UBC.  In his role at UBC, he assists donors in matching their philanthropic intentions with the multitude of opportunities on the UBC campuses, including complex gifts, gifts of securities and estate planning, allowing donors to meet their philanthropic goals in the most tax effective way.  His talk will be interest to individuals who would like to learn more about charitable giving, whether to UBC and/or another charity.

All emeriti and partners are welcome.

When: Wednesday, January 31 at 3pm
Where: room 222 at the Alumni Centre, 6163 University Blvd.
 
 
  • Film Group on January 23 at 2pm

Series Five: While comedy’s generic conventions can be extremely rigid and thus even more reinforcing of status quo values, favouring entrenched elites at the expense of those on the margins, this genre’s focus on humour can also encourage and acceptance of diversity and change. On the one hand, comedy tends to insist on managing new impulses within the established order, but it also can gently (or harshly) suggest a radical transformation of that order. Whether dealing with romance, family or social relationships or friendship, comedy can point towards a better future, even though its generally upbeat tone can also make us complacent.

Jan. 23 - The Miracle of Morgan’s Creek (1944) by Preston Sturges offers a romantic comedy and, more specifically, a home front romantic comedy set in and made during WWII. Such comedies deal with the anxiety around young women marrying soldiers just before they leave for the front, creating the possibility of socially dreaded widowed mothers. Sturges, the most intelligent of mid-century comedy directors, ingeniously combines his home front romantic comedy with a nativity story (the miracle referred to in the title) and upends romantic comedy’s focus on the couple with an emphasis on multiplicity.

All emeriti and partners are welcome. To get on the mailing list for meeting announcements, please contact John Leblanc: john.leblanc@ubc.ca
When: Tuesday, January 23 at 2pm
Where: Orchard Commons, room 3016, 6363 Agronomy Road
 
 
  • Philosophers’ Café on January 19 at 10:30am
Where is Feminism now?
Recent events in the news have brought the status of Feminism into a prominence it hasn’t had since the 1970s. To what extent have the battles fought then made a difference in our lives and the lives of our daughters and granddaughters—and, for that matter, our sons and grandsons? Is there equity of opportunity, access, and respect in the workplace? in politics? in the media? What has changed, and what hasn’t? Let’s talk about it!
 
When: Friday, January 17 from 10:30-11:30am
Where: Tapestry at Wesbrook Village, 3338 Wesbrook Mall
 
The Philosopher’s Cafés will be held in the Club Room in Tapestry at Wesbrook Village from 10:30 to 11:30am. Coffee and tea will be offered by Tapestry. You may reserve to have lunch at Tapestry after the Café by calling (604) 225-5000 or by checking in with the front desk before the Café.) 
 
 
  • Travel Group on January 18 at 3pm
“Two approaches to exploring northern Europe on a cruise.” Steve and Sirka Tredwell will talk about their Viking cruise to Norway, Denmark, Germany, Poland, Estonia, Russia, and Finland, and Carolyn Gilbert will talk about the Hurtigruten cruise of the Norwegian coast she and John took as part of a longer trip to Norway”.
All emeriti and partners are welcome. To get on the mailing list for meeting announcements, please contact Richard Spencer: richard@rhspencer.ca
When: Thursday, January 18 at 3pm
Where: room 224 at the Alumni Centre, 6163 University Blvd.
 
  • Senior Scholars’ Series with Ken Carty, Political Science, Tuesday, January 9 at 5pm at Green College
"Taking chances: A political scientist at large inside and outside the university"
After starting out in New Brunswick as a Forestry student, Kenneth Carty was led by his training in Economics and Politics into research on the political and electoral system in Ireland and so to similar subjects in the Canadian context. 
His talk will illustrate how saying “Yes” to unexpected opportunities can create new possibilities for intellectual and professional growth, raise research questions worth answering, lead to productive partnerships, and enable one to participate more fully in the collective enterprise of a research university.
 
When: Tuesday, January 9, 2018 from 5:00-6:30pm
Where: Green College Coachhouse, 6201 Cecil Green Park Road.
 
Complimentary tea and coffee are available in the Piano Lounge of Graham House at Green College from 4:30 pm onwards. Those attending talks at Green College are warmly invited to come to dinner. For information on making dinner reservations, please see http://www.greencollege.ubc.ca/how-attend-dinner
 
 
  • Photo Group, December 15 at 10am

All emeriti and partners are welcome. To get on the mailing list for meeting announcements, please contact Derek Applegarth: derekjenny@shaw.ca

When: Friday, December 15 at 10am
Where: Henry Angus Building, room 293

 

  • Senior Scholars' Series with Rabab Ward, Electrical and Computer Engineering on December 5

"Multimedia, brain-computer interfaces and medical instrumentation: dispatches of a pioneer woman in engineering across continents"
Rabab Ward grew up in a Moslem family in Lebanon, and has worked there as well as in Zimbabwe and North America. A specialist in the field of signal processing, she has had to overcome many hurdles in the course of a career in engineering that began in the early 1960s. For much of her working life she was the only woman in otherwise all-male academic departments. In this talk she recalls some of her formative professional experiences and discusses some of the exciting developments and applications in electrical engineering that have kept her curiosity sharp over decades.

When: Tuesday, December 5, 2017 from 5:00-6:30pm
Where: Green College Coachhouse, 6201 Cecil Green Park Road.
 
Complimentary tea and coffee are available in the Piano Lounge of Graham House at Green College from 4:30 pm onwards. Those attending talks at Green College are warmly invited to come to dinner. For information on making dinner reservations, please see http://www.greencollege.ubc.ca/how-attend-dinner
 
  • Celebrating UBC Emeriti Research Luncheon, November 21 at noon

More information available on our webpage.

When: Tuesday, November 21 at noon
Where: Peter Wall Institute, 6331 Crescent Road
 

  • Philosophers' Café on November 17 at 10:30am 
Healthcare in Canada?
Why does Canada only rank 9th out of 11 wealthy countries in its provision of healthcare?
Can’t we do better? What’s the best balance of public versus private healthcare?
 
For some suggested pre-café reading, see:
Suggested pre-reading:

When: Friday, November 17 from 10:30-11:30am
Where: Tapestry at Wesbrook Village, 3338 Wesbrook Mall

The Philosopher’s Cafés will be held in the Club Room in Tapestry at Wesbrook Village from 10:30 to 11:30am. Coffee and tea will be offered by Tapestry.
You may reserve to have lunch at Tapestry after the Café by calling (604) 225-5000 or by checking in with the front desk before the Café.)

PARKING: Visitor parking is available under Tapestry - you enter off Birney Ave (turn at the 4 way stop on Wesbrook Mall). You drive down the ramp and call reception (3338) from a phone beside your car when you stop at the gate to the parking. The instructions are on the screen above the keypad. If you say you are coming to a Philosophers’ Café, they will raise the gate and let you in. There is quite a lot of visitor parking, but it does fill up too, on occasion.

As a backup you could use the pay parking lot across the street from Save-On-Foods, on Berton Ave, which is a 2 minute walk from Tapestry (although that can also be full at times).

 

  • Travel Group on November 16 at 3pm
Don and Lorna Blake are scheduled to present "A Taste of the Basque Country", sharing their experiences of a trip to northern Spain in June 2017. 
 
All emeriti and partners are welcome. If you have a topic or travel experience you would like to discuss or present, please contact Richard Spencer, richard@rhspencer.caAlso, please contact Richard to be added to the email list for this group.
 
 

When: Thursday, November 16 at 3pm
Where: Polygon Homes Classroom 224, Alumni Centre

 

 

  • General Meeting on November 15 at 1pm
A Mid-Term Assessment of the Trudeau Liberal Government: 
A Presentation by Four UBC Experts
Chaired by Ken Carty, Professor Emeritus of Political Science

 
On November 4, 2017 the ‘new’ Trudeau Liberal government will celebrate two years in office. This makes it an appropriate time for a mid-term assessment of its record.
The government was elected on the basis that the country wanted a change from the policies and modalities of the Harper Conservative government. It ran on a platform of “Real Change” (https://www.liberal.ca/realchange/).
 
Our review will ask how they have performed:
• How do they compare to the previous Conservative government?
• How have they done in terms of their own platform promises?
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When: Wednesday, November 15 from 1 to 3:30pm

1:00pm: Coffee, tea and conversation
1:45pm: Business meeting
2:00pm: Panel discussion chaired by Ken Carty, Professor Emeritus Political Science

Where:  Jack Poole Hall, Alumni Centre  

 
  • Senior Scholars' Series with Bernie Shizgal, Chemistry on November 7

Bernie Shizgal’s multidisciplinary research work has been based on the kinetic theory of gases, applied to chemical reactions and later to the escape of planetary atmospheres and space science. This has led to collaborations with space scientists at NASA (Pioneer Venus), at ISAS (Japan) and at the University of Calgary (ePOP terrestrial satellite). Particular mathematical and numerical methods were developed for the solution of a multitude of applied problems in chemical kinetics, quantum mechanics, nucleation and image resolution for tomography. The talk will focus on his earliest research work and on the numerous scientists worldwide whose work had a profound and lasting effect on his scientific career.

When: Tuesday, November 7, 2017 from 5:00-6:30pm
Where: Green College Coachhouse, 6201 Cecil Green Park Road.
 
Complimentary tea and coffee are available in the Piano Lounge of Graham House at Green College from 4:30 pm onwards. Those attending talks at Green College are warmly invited to come to dinner. For information on making dinner reservations, please see http://www.greencollege.ubc.ca/how-attend-dinner
 
 
  • Film Group, October 31 at 2pm
Series Four – Film Noir: Beyond Genre - part 2 of 3
Given its status as a popular medium, film frequently relies on genre conven- tions in its storytelling, as the easily identifiable codes supporting plot and character facilitate the engagement of the audience.  Yet genre can also en- able a strong social critique as its conventions, either played straight or paro- died, invite the viewer to interrogate accepted values.  Such is the case with film noir, a genre whose appearance after World War II found it reflecting the disquiet engendered by the conflict, even in victorious America.
 
Oct. 31 – The Long Goodbye (1973) by Robert Altman can be classified as a revisionist, neo-noir, taking great liberties with the classic Raymond Chandler de- tective novel it is based on, not only in recasting Chandler’s hard-boiled detective as a bumbling laconic played by Elliot Gould but also radically altering the ending, revealing a post-hippy, pre-me generation world far beyond noir’s post-war angst.
The film boasts a radical visual style, featuring subtle shadows and pastel colors en- abled by Vilmos Zsigmond’s “flashing” technique, frequent camera movement that implicates the viewer as a voyeur and a score consisting of variations of a single song. The film has often been touted as one of the best of the 1970s.

 

When: Tuesday, October 31 at 2pm
Where: Orchard Commons, room 3058, 6363 Agronomy Road

 

  • Departmental Representatives Meeting, Tuesday October 24 at 2pm

All departmental representatives are invited to join this meeting. A personal invitation with an agenda was sent as well.

If your department does not have a departmental representative, please consider becoming the rep of your department. A list of departmental representatives can be found on the website.

When: Tuesday, October 11 from 2 to 4:30pm
Where: Henry Angus Building, 9th Floor, 2053 Main Mall
 

  • Philosophers' Café on October 20 at 10:30am 
How close are we to nuclear war?
Mini-nukes, big nukes: should we start building bomb shelters again? With rogue states and terrorists, as well as aging missile sites in the USA and unaccounted-for nuclear material in the former USSR, will we have to face a nuclear war?
Suggested pre-reading: "What would war with North Korea look like?" Check out: http://www.macleans.ca/politics/worldpolitics/what-would-nuclear-war-with-north-
 

When: Friday, October 20 from 10:30-11:30am
Where: Tapestry at Wesbrook Village, 3338 Wesbrook Mall

The Philosopher’s Cafés will be held in the Club Room in Tapestry at Wesbrook Village from 10:30 to 11:30am. Coffee and tea will be offered by Tapestry.
You may reserve to have lunch at Tapestry after the Café by calling (604) 225-5000 or by checking in with the front desk before the Café.)

PARKING: Visitor parking is available under Tapestry - you enter off Birney Ave (turn at the 4 way stop on Wesbrook Mall). You drive down the ramp and call reception (3338) from a phone beside your car when you stop at the gate to the parking. The instructions are on the screen above the keypad. If you say you are coming to a Philosophers’ Café, they will raise the gate and let you in. There is quite a lot of visitor parking, but it does fill up too, on occasion.

As a backup you could use the pay parking lot across the street from Save-On-Foods, on Berton Ave, which is a 2 minute walk from Tapestry (although that can also be full at times).

 

  • Travel Group, October 19 at 3pm

All emeriti and partners are welcome. If you have a topic or travel experience you would like to discuss or present, please contact Richard Spencer, richard@rhspencer.caAlso, please contact Richard to be added to the email list for this group.

When: Thursday, October 19 at 3pm
Where: Bill and Risa Levine Classroom 222, Alumni Centre
 

  • Photo Group, October 18 at 3pm

All emeriti and partners are welcome. To get on the mailing list for meeting announcements, please contact Derek Applegarth: derekjenny@shaw.ca

When: Wednesday, October 18 at 3pm
Where: Henry Angus Building
 

  • General Meeting with Wade Davis on October 11 at 2pm
Into the silence: the Great War, Mallory and the Conquest of Everest.
If the quest for Mount Everest began as a grand imperial gesture, as redemp- tion for an empire of explorers that had lost the race to the poles, it ended as  a mission of regeneration for a country and a people bled white by war. Of the twenty-six British climbers who, on three expeditions (1921-24), walked 400 miles off the map to find and assault the highest mountain on Earth, twenty had seen the worst of the fighting. Six had been severely wounded, two others nearly killed by disease at the Front, one hospitalized twice with shell shock. Four as army surgeons dealt for the duration with the agonies of the dying.
Two lost brothers, killed in action. All had endured the slaughter, the coughing of the guns, the bones and barbed wire, the white faces of the dead.
In a monumental work of history and adventure, ten years in the writing, Wade Davis asks not whether George Mallory was the first to reach the summit of Everest, but rather why he kept on climbing on that fateful day. His answer lies in a single phrase uttered by one of the survivors as they retreated from the mountain: ‘The price of life is death.’ Mallory walked on because for him, as for all of his generation, death was but ‘a frail barrier that men crossed, smiling and gallant, every day.’ As climbers they accepted a degree of risk unimaginable before the war. They were not cavalier, but death was no stranger. They had seen so much of it that it had no hold on them. What mattered What mattered was how one lived, the moments of being alive. For all of them Everest had become an exalted radiance, a sentinel in the sky, a symbol of hope in a world gone mad.
 
Wade Davis is Professor of Anthropology and the BC Leadership Chair in Cultures and Ecosys- tems at Risk at the University of British Columbia. Between 1999 and 2013 he served as Explorer- in-Residence at the National Geographic Society. Author of 20 books, including One River, The Wayfinders and Into the Silence, winner of the 2012 Samuel Johnson prize, he holds degrees in anthropology and biology and received his Ph.D. in ethnobotany, all from Harvard University. His many film credits include Light at the Edge of the World, an eight-hour documentary series written and produced for the Natioal Geographic Society. Davis is the recipient of 11 honorary degrees, as well as the 2009 Gold Medal from the Royal Canadian Geographical Society, the 2011 Explorers Medal, the 2012 David Fairchild Medal for botanical exploration, and the 2015 Centennial Medal of Harvard University. In 2016 he was made a Member of the Order of Canada.
 

When: Wednesday, October 11 from 2 to 4:30pm

2:00pm: Coffee, tea and conversation
3:00pm: Business meeting
3:15pm: Speaker Wade Davis

Where:  Cecil Green Park House at 6251 Cecil Green Park Road

 

  • Senior Scholars' Series with Judy Hall, Medical Genetics and Pediatrics; October 3, 2017

Set on her way towards a traditionally male profession by a mother who loved biology, Judith Hall entered medical school just as the science of genetics was coming of age. She became interested in the genetics of short stature during her training, and that led her into career-long clinical research on all types of congenital anomalies, particularly multiple congenital contractures (arthrogryposis), discordant twins, and non-traditional inheritance. In her talk she will relate some of the clinical discoveries that she has witnessed and how long it took for them too to “come of age”—i.e., for their underlying mechanisms to be understood. She will also reflect upon her scientific life-journey in Clinical Genetics and Pediatrics, her good fortune and sometimes dumb luck, and on how much she now likes being an academic Elder.

When: Tuesday, October 3, 2017 from 5:00-6:30pm
Where: Green College Coachhouse, 6201 Cecil Green Park Road.
 
Complimentary tea and coffee are available in the Piano Lounge of Graham House at Green College from 4:30 pm onwards. Those attending talks at Green College are warmly invited to come to dinner. For information on making dinner reservations, please see http://www.greencollege.ubc.ca/how-attend-dinner
 
 
  • Film Group, September 26 at 2pm
Series Four – Film Noir: Beyond Genre - part 1 of 3
Given its status as a popular medium, film frequently relies on genre conven- tions in its storytelling, as the easily identifiable codes supporting plot and character facilitate the engagement of the audience.  Yet genre can also en- able a strong social critique as its conventions, either played straight or paro- died, invite the viewer to interrogate accepted values.  Such is the case with film noir, a genre whose appearance after World War II found it reflecting the disquiet engendered by the conflict, even in victorious America.
 
The Breaking Point (1950) by Michael Curtiz may be the best film of this mainstream Hollywood director, noted for helming all-time top ten favourite Casablanca (1943). This later film (an adaptation of Hemingway’s To Have and Have Not) has only recently resurfaced, buried by Warner Bros. before its release when its star, John Garfield, appeared on the initial Hollywood communist black list. Featuring strong performances and stunning cinematography by Ted McCord (Treasure of the Sierra Madre, East of Eden), the film provides lucid commentary on nation, gender and race that is still relevant today.  Hemingway called the film the best screen adaptation of any of his works.

 

When: Tuesday, September 26 at 2pm
Where: Orchard Commons, room 3018, 6363 Agronomy Road

 

  • General Meeting with Wade Davis on October 11 at 2pm
Into the silence: the Great War, Mallory and the Conquest of Everest.
If the quest for Mount Everest began as a grand imperial gesture, as redemp- tion for an empire of explorers that had lost the race to the poles, it ended as  a mission of regeneration for a country and a people bled white by war. Of the twenty-six British climbers who, on three expeditions (1921-24), walked 400 miles off the map to find and assault the highest mountain on Earth, twenty had seen the worst of the fighting. Six had been severely wounded, two others nearly killed by disease at the Front, one hospitalized twice with shell shock. Four as army surgeons dealt for the duration with the agonies of the dying.
Two lost brothers, killed in action. All had endured the slaughter, the coughing of the guns, the bones and barbed wire, the white faces of the dead.
In a monumental work of history and adventure, ten years in the writing, Wade Davis asks not whether George Mallory was the first to reach the summit of Everest, but rather why he kept on climbing on that fateful day. His answer lies in a single phrase uttered by one of the survivors as they retreated from the mountain: ‘The price of life is death.’ Mallory walked on because for him, as for all of his generation, death was but ‘a frail barrier that men crossed, smiling and gallant, every day.’ As climbers they accepted a degree of risk unimaginable before the war. They were not cavalier, but death was no stranger. They had seen so much of it that it had no hold on them. What mattered What mattered was how one lived, the moments of being alive. For all of them Everest had become an exalted radiance, a sentinel in the sky, a symbol of hope in a world gone mad.
 
Wade Davis is Professor of Anthropology and the BC Leadership Chair in Cultures and Ecosys- tems at Risk at the University of British Columbia. Between 1999 and 2013 he served as Explorer- in-Residence at the National Geographic Society. Author of 20 books, including One River, The Wayfinders and Into the Silence, winner of the 2012 Samuel Johnson prize, he holds degrees in anthropology and biology and received his Ph.D. in ethnobotany, all from Harvard University. His many film credits include Light at the Edge of the World, an eight-hour documentary series written and produced for the Natioal Geographic Society. Davis is the recipient of 11 honorary degrees, as well as the 2009 Gold Medal from the Royal Canadian Geographical Society, the 2011 Explorers Medal, the 2012 David Fairchild Medal for botanical exploration, and the 2015 Centennial Medal of Harvard University. In 2016 he was made a Member of the Order of Canada.
 

When: Wednesday, October 11 from 2 to 4:30pm

2:00pm: Coffee, tea and conversation
3:00pm: Business meeting
3:15pm: Speaker Wade Davis

Where:  Cecil Green Park House at 6251 Cecil Green Park Road

 

  • Departmental Representatives Meeting, Tuesday October 24 at 2pm

All departmental representatives are invited to join this meeting. A personal invitation with an agenda was sent as well.

If your department does not have a departmental representative, please consider becoming the rep of your department. A list of departmental representatives can be found on the website.

When: Tuesday, October 11 from 2 to 4:30pm
Where: Henry Angus Building, 9th Floor, 2053 Main Mall

 

  • Film Group, October 31 at 2pm
Series Four – Film Noir: Beyond Genre - part 2 of 3
Given its status as a popular medium, film frequently relies on genre conven- tions in its storytelling, as the easily identifiable codes supporting plot and character facilitate the engagement of the audience.  Yet genre can also en- able a strong social critique as its conventions, either played straight or paro- died, invite the viewer to interrogate accepted values.  Such is the case with film noir, a genre whose appearance after World War II found it reflecting the disquiet engendered by the conflict, even in victorious America.
 
Oct. 31 – The Long Goodbye (1973) by Robert Altman can be classified as a revisionist, neo-noir, taking great liberties with the classic Raymond Chandler de- tective novel it is based on, not only in recasting Chandler’s hard-boiled detective as a bumbling laconic played by Elliot Gould but also radically altering the ending, revealing a post-hippy, pre-me generation world far beyond noir’s post-war angst.
The film boasts a radical visual style, featuring subtle shadows and pastel colors en- abled by Vilmos Zsigmond’s “flashing” technique, frequent camera movement that implicates the viewer as a voyeur and a score consisting of variations of a single song. The film has often been touted as one of the best of the 1970s.

 

When: Tuesday, October 31 at 2pm
Where: Orchard Commons, room 3058, 6363 Agronomy Road

  • Travel Group on November 16 at 3pm
Don and Lorna Blake are scheduled to present "A Taste of the Basque Country", sharing their experiences of a trip to northern Spain in June 2017. 
 
All emeriti and partners are welcome. If you have a topic or travel experience you would like to discuss or present, please contact Richard Spencer, richard@rhspencer.caAlso, please contact Richard to be added to the email list for this group.
 

When: Thursday, November 16 at 3pm
Where: Polygon Homes Classroom 224, Alumni Centre

 
  • Philosophers' Café on November 17 at 10:30am 
Healthcare in Canada?
Why does Canada only rank 9th out of 11 wealthy countries in its provision of healthcare?
Can’t we do better? What’s the best balance of public versus private healthcare?
 
For some suggested pre-café reading, see:
Suggested pre-reading:

When: Friday, November 17 from 10:30-11:30am
Where: Tapestry at Wesbrook Village, 3338 Wesbrook Mall

The Philosopher’s Cafés will be held in the Club Room in Tapestry at Wesbrook Village from 10:30 to 11:30am. Coffee and tea will be offered by Tapestry.
You may reserve to have lunch at Tapestry after the Café by calling (604) 225-5000 or by checking in with the front desk before the Café.)

PARKING: Visitor parking is available under Tapestry - you enter off Birney Ave (turn at the 4 way stop on Wesbrook Mall). You drive down the ramp and call reception (3338) from a phone beside your car when you stop at the gate to the parking. The instructions are on the screen above the keypad. If you say you are coming to a Philosophers’ Café, they will raise the gate and let you in. There is quite a lot of visitor parking, but it does fill up too, on occasion.

As a backup you could use the pay parking lot across the street from Save-On-Foods, on Berton Ave, which is a 2 minute walk from Tapestry (although that can also be full at times).

 

  • Celebrating UBC Emeriti Research Luncheon, November 21 at noon

More information available on our webpage.

When: Tuesday, November 21 at noon
Where: Peter Wall Institute, 6331 Crescent Road

  • Photo Group, December 15 at 10am

All emeriti and partners are welcome. To get on the mailing list for meeting announcements, please contact Derek Applegarth: derekjenny@shaw.ca

When: Friday, December 15 at 10am
Where: Henry Angus Building, room TBD

  •  Senior Scholars’ Series with Ken Carty, Political Science, Tuesday, January 9 at 5pm at Green College
"Taking chances: A political scientist at large inside and outside the university"
After starting out in New Brunswick as a Forestry student, Kenneth Carty was led by his training in Economics and Politics into research on the political and electoral system in Ireland and so to similar subjects in the Canadian context. 
His talk will illustrate how saying “Yes” to unexpected opportunities can create new possibilities for intellectual and professional growth, raise research questions worth answering, lead to productive partnerships, and enable one to participate more fully in the collective enterprise of a research university.
 
When: Tuesday, January 9, 2018 from 5:00-6:30pm
Where: Green College Coachhouse, 6201 Cecil Green Park Road.
 
Complimentary tea and coffee are available in the Piano Lounge of Graham House at Green College from 4:30 pm onwards. Those attending talks at Green College are warmly invited to come to dinner. For information on making dinner reservations, please see http://www.greencollege.ubc.ca/how-attend-dinner